stannyblade

Tips for servicing Hornby locos needed

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Hi

A lot will depend on the age of the loco.

Very early Hornby locos will have loco mounted motors of the Open Frame type XO3 or XO4 style. Later types Hornby went over to tender drive where tenders are used and installed Ringfield motors. These were also used in may of their diesel outline locos too. Now modern locos use the so called 'Can' motor.

 

XO3, XO4 and Ringfield motors can be user serviced, but unfortunately Can motors cannot. They can only be replaced if the original motor has failed.

 

When servicing any loco only use lubricants sold specifically for model railway use. Do not use 3 in 1 oil which is too thick and fine for the bike chain but not model railways. Also do not use spray lubricants like WD40, these over time turn into a thick goo mess which will need to be removed.

Next keep to the gold rule of oiling... If you can see it (the oil) its probably too much!  Only apply oil with the tip of a pin or needle etc. Dip the pin into the oil then place the pins tip where the oil is needed. If you accidentally apply too much oil blot up the surplus with some tissue paper or kitchen roll paper.  Lubricate all pivot points and on steam outline locos the pins on the wheels connecting the drive motion together on a loco and the motors two bearings where the drive shaft emerges at both ends of the motor.

 

If the motor Commutator is accessible (It is not on most Can motors) then use a fibre pencil to clean each of the copper segments of the Comm.  Use the tip of a wooden cocktail stick to lightly scrape along the insulation gaps between each copper segment to remove any build up of carbon form the two brushes.

Next ensure the two carbon brushes are in good order and are being lightly held onto the Comm by the motors brush springs.  Replacement carbon brushes and springs are available from good spares suppliers.

If necessary apply special white grease sold for model railway use by good model shops to the gear train from the motor to the wheels.

 

After servicing a loco, run it in for several minutes in each direction without any load attached. 

 

Early Hornby loco service sheets are available here if they are of any help... http://www.hornbyguide.com/service_sheet_menu.asp

 

 

Edit to correct typo.

Edited by Brian

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Hi

I have been using the pen type oiler. As supplied by Expo to many model shops http://www.anticsonline.co.uk/1674_1_14903.html

Woodland Scenics also supply a lubrication range under the brand name of Hob-E a full range of of oil and grease is for example shown here. http://www.anticsonline.co.uk/1674_1.html

Labelle is also excellent https://www.ontracks.co.uk/index.php?page=product&prodID=117378&catID=140   107 or 108.

 

All these oils lubricate the whole locos moving parts including motor bearings and any other pivots etc.

Edited by Brian

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Hi

I use IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol) 99.9% variety. But keep it off of plastics wherever possible. I buy mine from ebay suppliers...Example . http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/500ml-Isopropyl-Alcohol-IPA-Isopropanol-99-9-Pure-/161108080512?pt=UK_BOI_Medical_Lab_Equipment_Lab_Supplies_ET&hash=item2582ca3780

You can immerse a complete motor in IPA once its been removed from its chassis, remove and allow it to dry and then lubricate it.

But normally there is no need to do anything other than clean the motors Comm. segments with the fibre brush, scrape out the segment insulation, check carbon brushes and lightly lubricate the two bearing on the casing where the shaft emerges. That is on motors that are accessible internally - not Can motors.

Edited by Brian

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iWhen Brian mentions 99.9% IPA he really means 99.9% - anything else has a higher content of purified water and will take longer to dry resulting in corrosion of surfaces whereas the 99.9% is almost pure alcohol and will evaporate very, very quickly leaving no nasty residue but it's bad news for plastics or delicate painted surfaces. :wacko:

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Tri-ang Railways, Tri-ang Hornby, Hornby Railways and Hornby locomotives all come originaly with an instruction sheet, which have basic maintenance guides for the locomotives of the time the Instruction Sheet or book was printed.

 

These can be obtained, to replace original lost ones, from various sources.

 

Ringfield Motors....

Type 5 and 6, 1989.

Photo0167.thumb.jpg.16ce1154c69a1f85a7495cba9a1ca702.jpg

The first type of Tri-ang Hornby / Hornby Railways Ringfield Motor. Type 1.

Photo0168.thumb.jpg.ec4679137720b13bf2116a007342dec7.jpg

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