Broadoak

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  1. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    Hello John, Thank you for your kind comments. With regard to the road and hard standing area, it is a thick card used by printers as a backing for pads. Although any card will do really it is glued down with PVA then give several thin coats of pale grey household emulsion paint. You build the colour up a bit at a time. Then very thin washes of dark grey acrylics are brushed over the base coats when thoroughly dry. The cracks and joins that represent the way concrete is laid are lines drawn with a pen and black ink. A bit at a time seems to work for me. Hope this helps. Kind regards Peter M
  2. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    A Rock Island chop nose GP 9 arrives with a small train of loaded hoppers full of grain. The CRP (The Chicago Rock Island and Pacific) as a whole did not approve of chopped noses which were deemed to be an unnecessary expense even in 1975. She leaves the cars in the loop and runs round the train then backs into the pulp wood loading siding and couples up to pulp wood cars that are still being loaded. Peter M As the loading of the pulpwood is being completed the yard goat, a Rock Island SW1500 wearing a coat of bankruptcy blue spots the grain cars at the flour mill. While the SW1500 spots the incoming grain cars the chop nosed jeep leaves with the loaded pulpwood cars for Louisiana and the Continental Can Mill. Peter M Having spotted the covered hoppers the crew of the SW1500 head back to the yardmaster’s grounded caboose to have a break for some beans and await their next assignment. Peter M By way of a change from its usual maintenance of way duties #53 a TVRR 60 tonner arrives at Benson with a short cut of cars. It spots the cars in the long loop in the west yard uncouples from the front and runs round its train and couples up to the RI boxcar at the rear of the cars. Peter M The tanker full of fuel oil is spotted at the minimal service facilities. The next load to be spotted is the green Texas Mexican Railway box car at Talbot Valley Farmers Coop where it will be loaded with pink tomatoes. To accesses the TVFC a Simpson Timber Company must be moved first. Having done that the Tex Mex boxcar is spotted at the TVFC so loading can begin. The Simpson box car is picked and spotted back at the Bantex Box Co so they can continue loading it. Peter M #53 runs round the empty Rock Island box car and propels it into the team track in the east yard. Here it will be loaded with palletised drilling mud which is used to seal the drill bit shaft when drilling for oil. Peter M #53 then trundles to the pulp wood loading track and picks up two loaded racks and pulls them into the loop in west yard. She runs round her small train and sets off past the yardmaster’s grounded caboose to the SP interchange. Peter M Agriculture and Lumber especially are big business for the I&W railroad. As it is surrounded by large forests of trees suitable for paper pulp making and in the manufacture of particle board. Much of the land that was open caste mined for bauxite in the past has been made into forest by replacing the overburden and planting trees. These various trees reach maturity in three to five years so it is a continuous process. We see #145 a Burlington and Northern end cab switcher arriving at Benson from Hope with a cut of empty pulp wood cars and an empty DRGW covered hopper. Although well into the 1970’s the little switcher has managed to avoid being re-painted in corporate green and black and still sports its GN livery. You will note on the deck of the pulpwood cars debris from previous loads, it is sawdust really on the model but I think looks quite effective. Peter M
  3. A few shots to illustrate the differences of the Opel truck the earlier version being the grey coloured example with the gas producer. Actually it was the red and green version which came out later in real life that reminded me of the OB Bedfords that were used in the logging industry in New Zealand that sparked my interest in rail trucks. When first made up this model was used to check clearances on the layout. Peter M That concludes the pictorial tour. As I was on my own I took the opportunity to run some of the motive power that does not get run very often. The layout is out again in August then has a break until October. Peter M I did a local show last year at a place called Cogenhoe, pronounced locally as Cook na. Andy Knott my usual helper had brought along his camera and he took a few photos of the layout. Wooden bodied Simplex with hidden driver and his small white assistant. Opel Blitz arriving in yard having spent the day in the fields in preparation for harvesting the main crop potatoes. A view inside the dark interior of the engine shed. Peter M A few more shots taken during a typical operating session at the show. Peter M A close up of skip chassis loaded with sundry items for repair in the workshops. These sort of jobs are done during the winter and other odd times when field work is not possible. The Porter trundles by the greenhouse where the tomatoes seem to be doing rather well this year. The milk maid is seen collecting eggs in a bucket from the free range hens. The figure is a Britain’s model that has been weathered, no that’s wrong, you can’t weather people. She has been re-painted which unfortunately has not done much to improve her looks. Peter M You will be relieved to know that this is the last selection of photographs taken at the show. Peter M
  4. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    #381 backs her train of pulp wood cars into the west yard loading track and leaves them to be loaded. The geep then runs up to the servicing area and ties up while the crew head for a nearby diner. Peter M The I&W geep is seen tied up at the rear of the west yard master’s grounded caboose. The crew, having shut the engine down have to loose themselves in town for a few hours while their train is loaded with pulp wood brought in by trucks. The crew return and re-start the geep then head down to the pulpwood loading track. They find their train is loaded and ready to go. So they couple onto it and pull the train to the loop, park the cars and run round the train. When they have coupled onto the front of the train after a brake test they set off for the mill at Hodge LA picking up more loads on the way. Peter M This session features the second I&W GP 38-2 # 382 the one without dynamic brakes, I don’t know why but I prefer the clean lines on the long hood on this one. She is seen arriving with a cut of mixed cars that will be loaded at Benson later. The first job on arrival is to spot the RI covered hopper of wheat at the Trisco flour mill. Peter M The Rock Island covered hopper is cut out of the train and pushed into the Trisco flour mill siding for unloading. Peter M Peter M #382 GP38-2 has made up its outbound train in the loop at Benson. Runs round its train then heads out of town for the I&W main line to Hope. Peter M In the area surrounding Benson in south west Arkansas one of the most important source of revenue for the railroad is the lumber industry. When the open cast bauxite mine at Colonel’s Crossing became exhausted the overburden was replaced and the whole area planted with Pine and Aspen. These trees are fast growing, reaching maturity in three to five years and are a renewable resource that provides much of the lumber shipped out on the Rock Island via the I&W main line. A RI U33B arrives with a train of empty pulpwood flats which it spots in the loop and runs down to the loco servicing area. The yard goat that day, a RI SW1500 pushes the cars into the pulp loading track. Peter M While the crew of the RI U-boat have a break and a meal in a local diner the switcher crew make up a train for the U-boat to return to the RI main line with. Peter M
  5. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    A typical mid week scene at Benson, nothing exotic just TVRR geep #8 working in the yard. She has been rebuilt in the I&W shops at Rosston to a full GP18 specification and so is now 1800 hp. She is joined later in the day by an SP SD45 looking slightly less than immaculate on a train of empty boxcars that will be loaded with lumber. Peter M I&W geep with pulp wood flats. Peter M
  6. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    Here are a few pictures of a pair of F7A’s still wearing their SP livery but now on The I&W short line roster. They are the power on a pulpwood train on its way to Louisiana and the Continental Can factory there. An I&W Alco S2 is seen pulling a couple of box cars. Then again passing the Arkansas Feed Co. premises pushing a small cut of covered hoppers in the yard at Benson. Then we see a close up of a pneumatic trailer of chicken feed pellets for delivery locally. The trailer came with a much more modern tractor unit which I felt was not right being far too modern the period modelled. So it is now pulled by a White Freightliner tractor unit with a V12 Detroit Diesels engine, which I think looks better for my period in the mid 1970’s. Peter M Some more photos for the Alco enthusiasts this time taken by me on Andy’s last visit. This time there is a bonus with some photos of a Delaware & Lackawanna C420 switching cars at Benson. I also managed to get a few shots of the Morristown & Erie Alco working in the yard as well at the same time. Peter M Peter M Another fix for the Alco-holics this time featuring the Morristown & Erie C424 seen lurking in various parts of Benson yard. These are more of the pictures I took on Andy’s last visit, but it is one of his locos, the usual all singing and dancing job with lights and sound. Peter M We come now to the end of that Alco session, I am sure there will be more, Andy seems unable to resist them. Not that there is anything wrong with that. So the last couple of shots show the two Alcos tied up while the crew head off to a nearby diner for some beans. Peter M
  7. The last picture features a Canadian Ford which as a boy was a particular favourite of mine. A local fair used to spend the winter at a nearby farm and brought sacks filled with logs during winter months to help the coal supplies go further. They had one of these painted a desert sand colour with wide chunky tyres and the wheel nuts painted in red. I used to hope the driver would give me a ride but needless to say he never did. Peter M A few more views of the activities in the yard, I think the Canadian Ford looks very purposeful in profile. The hall was rather dark in the area where I had to set it up with little natural light, but I must admit the photographs have turned out slightly better than I expected. Although the show was mainly aimed at SG modern image modellers the farm was well received by the visitors, the tractors proving especially popular especially with the ladies. Peter M
  8. I did a small local exhibition recently with my regular helper Andy Knott who was in David Baily mode and took a few pictures. A touch more arty than his usual fare I think. Peter M While checking everything over prior to another exhibition I did a couple of jobs I have been meaning to do for some time. I have never liked the look of the driver in the green shunter, he was too big and odd looking so I used the dog as a sort of distraction. Now the shunter has a new driver and the little white dog has now taken up residence on the wooden bodied Simplex along with his owner who can no longer be seen. Children at shows seem to like to see the little white dog . Peter M A few more general views of the yard on a typical working day. Peter M
  9. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    Here we find a DRGW GP60 making up its own small train in Benson east yard, there being a shortage of yard switchers that day. The DRGW geep is seen collecting an empty liquid fertiliser tank car from the premises of R E Lee Farm Supplies. Having made up a small train the loco leaves the yard past Arkansas Feed Co and heads for the SP main line. Peter M A few pictures for all you Alco addicts, these photos were taken recently by my old buddy Andy Knott on one of his visits. The locomotive featured is an ex CP Alco C424 but now on the Morristown & Erie roster. She is seen arriving with a train of loaded covered hoppers. Peter M Peter M
  10. Broadoak

    Willin Ford

    Hello John, This one is about ten feet long and 9 inches going up to a foot wide at the station and goods yard end. I'm afraid I don't have a plan of the layout but it's pretty simple. Just an excuse to run my favourite locomotives really. Kind regards Peter M
  11. Peter M Peter M That is it I'm afraid. Can I thank again Chris Nevard for taking the photos and Model Rail for letting me share them. Peter M
  12. Broadoak

    Willin Ford

    A small prairie arriving at Willin Ford with a B set, a typical western branch line train. Having arrived the engine uncouples and runs forward to replenish its water tanks. Peter M No 4545 then runs back past the coaches in the loop so it can couple onto the other end. Once coupled up and a vacuum of 21 inches obtained the driver awaits the guard’s whistle and then sets off for the junction. Peter M
  13. Broadoak

    Benson Arkansas

    Every so often I give all my fleet of locomotives a check over and a bit of a run. This geep was one of the first road switchers I bought well over twenty years ago and it runs as sweetly now as it ever did. It is a Blue Box Athearn that I have chopped the nose on, the fiction being it was re-built in the fictional Interstate & Western's workshops at Rosston to a full GP 18 specification. In the following sequence I&W #6 is seen arriving at Benson with a train of empty pulpwood flats, then laying over at the west yard engine facilities. Having seen the amount of debris left on the deck of real pulpwood flat cars I added some sawdust on the models to replicate the real thing. Peter M The model featured this time is a Mopac EMD SW1200 end cab switcher made from an early Athearn Blue Box kit with added details. I know the fuel tank is not quite right it should extend downwards and outwards more. Also I have now seen a colour photograph of an actual Mopac switcher and the trucks on some examples at least are the same colour as the body. I have gone back in time as well in order to use some freight cars with roof walks that don't often get an airing. I bought these years ago when I first got into modelling the American scene. They are a mix of Bachmann ready made and Athearn and Roundhouse shake the box kits. It is assumed the SW1200 brought the train in from Pine Bluff via the SP interchange. Peter M Peter M Peter M I have been given a CD of photographs taken when Colonel's Crossing was still connected to Benson before being dismantled a few years ago. The photos were taken by my old buddy Andy Knott who is also the owner of the eastern road locomotives featured later. The first two show a bankruptcy blue Rock Island SW1500 #947, an Athearn BB with added details rolling past the depot then the grade crossing at CC. TVRR Alco RS1 trundles over Colonel's Creek with a covered SF hopper in tow. The John Deere van driver is keen to get to his next job. The RS1 and train are now clear of the crossing so the JD van driver sets off to repair a broken down tractor at a farm nearby. Peter M Another couple of shots of the bankruptcy blue SW1500. Here we have another RI SW1500 # 942 this time wearing an earlier livery rolling over the grade crossing. Then at rest under the heavy lift equipment at the small engine house. Peter M A few more photos of Colonel's Crossing this time with a guest locomotive, a D&H Alco RS36 #5023 seen in the yard and passing the depot. An aerial view looking down the yard from the tunnel end, bottom left. This originally hid the fiddle yard. The picture gives an idea of the track layout. Peter M A few more pictures of Colonel's Crossing with some guest Alco locomotives. D&H Alco RS36 #5023 standing on the team track by the Farmer's Coop elevator while the crew take a break for beans. The Alco RS36 is working a cut of bauxite ore cars through the loader. The brakeman takes the time to roll a cigarette. An aerial view of the Alco as she pulls the cut of ore cars through the loader. D&H Alco C424 #452 about to collect a cut of loaded ore cars. Peter M A view showing the small engine house and tunnel mouth at Colonel's Crossing. A Talbot Valley RR Alco S2 is idling standing over the inspection pit. Note the sophisticated point control, piano wire in tube and chocolate block connectors for knobs, it's never failed in well over twenty years use. Window cleaner at the depot at CC now used as an office by the freight agent. An I&W GP 38-2 emerging from the tunnel that originally hid the fiddle yard when the layout was exhibited. A pair of I&W geeps wearing a later colour scheme roll out into the sunshine from the gloom of the tunnel. A general view of part of the loco servicing facility at CC. The two geeps are not mine in fact but belong to my old buddy Andy Knott who filmed them on a visit. Peter M The Alco visitor this time is from a genuine short line called Delaware Lackawanna who run a freight service from Scranton PA to Carbondale and to Mount Pocono. The model a C420 belongs to my old friend Andy Knott who bought them from a model shop in the USA via E-bay. He brought it up a couple of weeks ago to have a run on my Benson layout. It is DCC fitted as are most of his locos. Peter M A Lake Superior and Ishpeming Alco RSD 15 a 2400 hp road switcher, these pictures show why they are known as alligators by rail fans. She is seen here working in the yards at Benson. The model, a Broadway Limited example is another of Andy's second hand purchases from the States. It is in the throes of having the hand rails painted to match the base body colour. Alco built 75 of these switchers and the ATSF bought 50 of them. The LS&I purchased seven of these locomotives from the ATSF when retired in the mid 70's. Peter M Peter M
  14. Franco many thanks for your kind words they are much appreciated. The rail trucks tend to be run the same way and are lifted on and off the track in the fiddle yard, all they do is shffle back and forth. The shunters are run in both directions. The fiddle yard is supposed to represent the rest of the railway. The whole thing is supposed to be fun and shouldn't be taken too seriously Kind regards Peter M