rogerfarnworth

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  1. For a number of years in the 1920s and possibly also the 1930s my grandfather worked as a blacksmith in Horwich Loco Works. The works have always, as a result, had a specific interest for me. It has been somewhat saddening over the years to see their gradual deterioration and eventual closure. In November 2019 I finished reading Issue No. 27 of the Railway Archive Journal published by Black Dwarf Lightmoor Press of Lydney, Gloucestershire. I enjoyed reading Jeff Wells article in the journal about the Manchester Exhibition of 1887. [1] The article highlights a number of railway exhibits on display at the exhibition. Among these exhibits was 'Dot' a Beyer Peacock 1ft 6 inch gauge 0-4-0T engine. 'According to the official catalogue, Dot was 'specifically built for working on tramways in yards and workshops, and also adopted for tail-rope shunting of ordinary wagons'. After the exhibition, Dot found work at the L&YR's Horwich Works, joining two other Beyer, Peacock 18 in engines, Wren and Robin, which had arrived in April 1887. Such engines were considered necessary to convey materials around the seven miles of internal works' railway.' http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/11/30/horwich-loco-works-18-gauge-railway-part-1 Horwich Locomotive Works "was the last major British railway works to be established on a green field site. There were traditionally very strong links between the Lancashire & Yorkshire and London & North Western railways, and John Ramsbottom, late of the LNWR was in 1883 appointed consultant to the LYR regarding the planning of Horwich Works. He advocated an 18in gauge internal transport system similar to that he had earlier installed at Crewe. Originally extending to 7½ miles, this enjoyed a longer life as the last surviving locomotive built for it, 'Wren', was not retired until 1962. The system was used for moving components around the works."
  2. I have recently purchased the six copies of The Railway Magazine which were issued in 1948. The first of these coincides with the formation of British Railways, and the January/February 1948 issue of the magazine highlights for the readers a little of the history of railways in Britain which led up to that momentous occasion. The linked article below builds on the article in The Railway Magazine. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/12/09/british-railways-1948
  3. The Lynn and Fakenham Railway - Part 1. .... This post results from reading Issue No. 30 of the "Railway Archive" Journal. It contains an article about the locomotives originally purchased for the Cornwall Minerals Railway. That company dramatically over-ordered motive power and when it lease was taken over by the GWR, 50% of its original order were returned to the manufacturer Sharp, Stewart of Manchester. Eight if these locomotives found their way to the Lynn & Fakenham Railway and eventually onto the books of the Midland & Great Northern Joint Railway. This first post about the Lynn & Fakenham Railway focusses on these locomotives. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/11/16/the-lynn-and-fakenham-railway-part-1
  4. This next post relates in passing to the Penydarren Tramroad. It focuses primarily on the Plymouth Ironworks an Collieries which grew as a result of the existence of the Tramroad and the later railways in the Taff Valley. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/11/13/the-plymouth-or-south-duffryn-colliery-in-the-taff-valley
  5. In early November 2019, my wife and I spent a week or so staying just to the Southwest of Lancaster. During our time there we walked along much of the old Glasson Dock Branch which is now a cycleway alongside the River Lune. We were fortunate with the weather!The linked article below describes the line and its history. .... .http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/11/27/the-glasson-dock-branch
  6. There is a lot more to cover about the railways in and around King's Lynn. This post gives a flavour of what is to come in due course. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/10/21/early-railway-history-in-kings-lynn There is a significant length of the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway, the branch to Hunstanton, the original length of the line from Gaywood towards Bawsey and a number of quarry and other short lines, without even considering the main line towards Ely. When time permits. .... .... ......
  7. Further decline in the urban tramway network in Nice occurred from the late 1920s into the 1930s. Buses became politically more acceptable than the trams. .... This post continues my reflections based on a translation of the work of Jose Banaudo from French into English. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/10/14/the-tnl-tram-network-the-changes-in-the-urban-network-1929-1934-chemins-de-fer-de-provence-86
  8. Very recently, I have been reading a book about the Bicester Military Railway which was published in 1992. It was published by the Oxford Publishing Company and is widely available to buy second-hand. It is worth a read. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/10/12/bicester-military-railway-book-review
  9. I have recently encountered two small books, both of which are facsimile editions of much older books. The first is a 19th century guide to the Forest of Dean for early holiday makers. The second provides a guide to the various coal mines in the Forest. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/10/05/two-pocket-books-about-the-forest-of-dean
  10. Yet another Forest colliery and its railways and tramways - Trafalgar Colliery http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/09/24/trafalgar-colliery-and-railway
  11. In August 2019 my wife and I belated celebrated our 20th wedding anniversary by having a few days away. We chose to stay West of Llanymynech in the Welsh Borders.While we were there we travelled the length of the Tanat Valley, following as closely as we could the route of the old Light Railway.Much of the time on the journey we were looking across a couple of fields and noting a slight rise in the land along the line of the old railway!We started the journey down the valley from Pennant Melangell and it's picturesque church. Intriguingly, there was a small museum in the church tower which included a number of things relating to the old Light Railway.Sadly, we timed this excursion badly and were unable to visit the visitor centre at Nantmwr. It was closed in the days that we were in the area.This post gives a great deal of background information about the line and the Tanat Valley. I hope, in the next post to follow the route of the line as best as possible.http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/09/18/the-tanat-valley-light-railway-and-the-nantmawr-branch-part-1You will note that one of the reference documents used is a GCE project report about Llangynog and the railway which I came across in St. Melangell's Church.
  12. Another Forest of Dean Colliery. .... Flour Mill Colliery. ....http://rogerfarnworth.com/2017/09/30/the-flour-mill-colliery
  13. The industrial history of the Forest of Dean is such that the intensity of activity was high throughout the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. Innovation was rife and nowhere was this more true than in its transport infrastructure.In, what history will ultimately regard as, a very short period of time, tramroads were built and became the dominant form of transport. They waned and were replaced by broad gauge railways which in turn lost out to what was the dominant but probably inferior standard-gauge. For a time, all were active in the Forest at once. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/09/15/different-railway-gauges-in-operation-the-forest-of-dean My wife and I stay in the Forest of Dean most years. September 2019 was no exception. We stayed in a cottage close to what were Cannop and Speech House Collieries which were both rail served when they were active collieries. I have already posted about Cannop Colliery as part of this series of posts. It seems appropriate that I post something about Speech House Colliery.http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/09/14/speech-house-hill-colliery-and-railway