rogerfarnworth

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rogerfarnworth last won the day on April 28 2018

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  1. rogerfarnworth

    Japanese Railways

    The Kiso Forest Railways - Part C This next post covers another of the significant 762mm railways in the Kiso Forest. The Ogawa Forest Railway. This railway was connected directly to the Otaki Forest Railway. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/21/japanese-narrow-gauge-762mm-lines-part-4-the-kiso-railway-part-c-the-ogawa-forest-railway
  2. rogerfarnworth

    Japanese Railways

    The Kiso Forest Railways - Part B This post covers one of the main logging railway networks in the Kiso Valley. .... The Otaki Forest Railway. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/16/japanese-narrow-gauge-762mm-lines-part-3-the-kiso-railway-part-b-the-otaki-forest-railway
  3. rogerfarnworth

    Britain's Lost Railways

    At Christmas 2018, a friend gave me a book by John Minnis entitled 'Britain's Lost Railways'. It would be natural to assume that this was a book about the different lines that have been lost throughout the UK. This is, however, a book about the lost infrastructure that surrounds the railway, particularly about railway architecture. I have written a short review of the book: http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/16/book-review-john-minnis-britains-lost-railways-a-commemoration-of-our-finest-railway-architecture
  4. rogerfarnworth

    The Penydarren Tramway

    I have just begun reading a book by John Minnis - 'Britain's Lost Railways' - and found this picture which he says is the only one known to be in existence of the Mertyr/Penydarren Tramroad in use.
  5. rogerfarnworth

    Japanese Railways

    762mm Gauge - Part 2 - The Kiso Forest Railways - Part A This next post provides an introduction to the Logging Railways in the Kiso Forest. Only a short tourist railway now remains of what was once a very large system of 762mm lines. I am currently working on a short survey of one of the lines which made up the network. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/11/japanese-narrow-gauge-762mm-lines-part-2-the-kiso-railway-part-a
  6. rogerfarnworth

    MonoRailways

    The Listowel and Ballybunion Railway I have already posted this elsewhere and I suspect I might be told that this is not really a mono-rail. The railway has fascinated me for some time . I hope this post is of interest on this thread. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2018/12/31/the-listowel-and-ballybunion-railway I have just purchased "Monorails of the 19th Century" by Adrian S. Garner, (Lightmoor Press) I am looking forward to reading it in the next few weeks.
  7. rogerfarnworth

    Rails in the Road

    I was given a copy of the book by Oliver Green, 'Rails in the Road' as a Christmas present. I have just finished reading it. The link below is to a review of the book. It is a large, coffee-table-sized book with a price tag of £30.00. It is illustrated throughout with high quality contemporary images. The story of the tram in the UK is well written and it seems to me that the author shows a good understanding of the underlying social issues which surrounded public transport throughout the decades of the late 19th, the 20th and the 21st centuries. Oliver Green was Head Curator of the London Transport Museum and now acts in a consultative capacity to a number of transport museums. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/09/book-review-rails-in-the-road-by-oliver-green Have others read the book?
  8. rogerfarnworth

    Railways and Tramways of the Forest of Dean

    Recently, I have begun researching some of the tramways/tramroads in the valleys of South Wales. The first of these that I looked at was the Penydarren Tramroad. While I was looking at the website of the Industrial Railway Society (https://www.irsociety.co.uk) I came across a story which related to the Forest if Dean and, in particular, the Severn & Wye Railway & Canal Company. The link below highlights the story of what appears to have been the research necessary before purchasing the first steam locomotive the Forest of Dean. It also pints to what could have been a far earlier introduction of steam traction into the Forest. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/08/a-first-steam-locomotive-for-the-severn-and-wye-tramway
  9. rogerfarnworth

    The Penydarren Tramway

    I promised a survey of the line between Abercynon and Merthyr Tydfil. This next post follows the Penydarren Tramroad along its full length. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/02/06/the-penydarren-tramroad-south-wales-part-2
  10. rogerfarnworth

    The Penydarren Tramway

    I am continuing to read through old copies of ‘The Railway Magazine’. This time it is the December 1950 edition. It contains a short article about the Kelvedon and Tollesbury Light Railway in Essex. This article held my interest because it relates to a line not too far from Braintree in Essex where we lived between 1970 and 1972. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/29/the-kelvedon-and-tollesbury-light-railway
  11. rogerfarnworth

    Japanese Railways

    Cape Gauge Cape Gauge was used in many countries throughout the world. It has been identified primarily with the Cape Colony in South Africa but was used first in the UK on a variety of tramways. Later its use extended into a number of countries in the Far East including New Zealand, Indonesia and in particular Japan. Cape Gauge was chosen as the 'standard gauge' in Japan. This post provides an introduction to the historic railways of Japan. The story includes a variety of different gauges. The use of different gauges seems at least as complex as the situation in the UK.This post is an introduction to the railways of Japan and centres around the use of Cape Gauge. .... .... https://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/09/japanese-railway-history-cape-gauge 762mm Gauge - Part 1 - The Kurobe Gorge Railway I hope to produce a short series of short posts over the next little while which look at some of the 2ft 6in track-gauge railway in Japan. This is the first. The Kurobe Gorge Railway is both as tourist railway and a supply line to the hydroelectric power stations along the Kurobe River Gorge. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/30/japanese-narrow-gauge-762mm-lines-part-1-the-kurobe-gorge-railway
  12. rogerfarnworth

    The Kelvedon and Tollesbury Light Railway

    I am continuing to read through old copies of ‘The Railway Magazine’. This time it is the December 1950 edition. It contains a short article about the Kelvedon and Tollesbury Light Railway in Essex. This article held my interest because it relates to a line not too far from Braintree in Essex where we lived between 1970 and 1972. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/29/the-kelvedon-and-tollesbury-light-railway
  13. rogerfarnworth

    The Ashover Light Railway

    And finally .... .... ... This is the third of three planned posts about the Ashover Light Railway. I hope you enjoy the final installment. .... http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/19/the-ashover-light-railway-part-3
  14. rogerfarnworth

    The Ashover Light Railway

    This is another thread prompted by reading old copies of "The Railway Magazine" from 1950. The September 1950 magazine carried a short article about the Ashover Light Railway which had finally closed over the majority of its length to freight traffic in March 1950.The post below is the first of at least two.http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/15/the-ashover-light-railway-part-1I hope you enjoy it. Much of the information comes from three sources .... The Railway Magazine, Wikipedia, and the website of the Ashover Light Railway Society. The Society's website is well worth a visit.http://www.alrs.org.uk This is the second post in a short series about the Ashover Light Railway. It covers the length of the line from the Clay Cross Works to Stretton Halt. ....http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/19/the-ashover-light-railway-part-2
  15. rogerfarnworth

    The Ballachulish Railway Line

    This is the third of three posts planned to cover the Ballachulish Branch. It includes the final length of the line approaching Ballachulish, some details about the quarries and a November 1950 article about the line which has been taken from The Railway Magazine of that date. http://rogerfarnworth.com/2019/01/05/the-ballachulish-railway-line-part-3