matt_d10

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About matt_d10

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  1. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    There’s usually a shelf of standard gauge HO stock...mostly common stuff like Bullet trains and multiple units (in that shop there was that one shelf of HO you can see and 7/8 of N gauge).There’s a small amount of narrow gauge in the glass cabinet (the rest is Z) and there is sometimes some more obscure stuff from smaller manufacturers. The narrow gauge is almost all HOe.
  2. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    Here's a video of the Rokuhan display layout as the guy was closing the blinds! Apologies for filming in portrait! Rokuhan Display Layout
  3. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    Well I got back yesterday (just 2 days there unfortunately) so spent most of it recovering, but not before running in (or playing with...) my new purchases! First was the rokuhan shorty chassis I wanted (I bought 2), a trailer car, a Kiha style body and a loop of track. I wasn’t intending on getting either the track or body, but the prices are so reasonable and it looks slightly better than just a bare chassis! The loop of track is 45mm radius, seriously tiny stuff! As you’d expect, it all ran floorlessly out of the pack. It’s rather simplistic but it’s based on the N gauge “B train” which means modellers can model full trains in considerably smaller lengths. The range available in N is quite unbelievable and I had to resist a purchase! Here’s how it looks all set up! I can’t think of many applications for actual modelling, but it’s a bit of fun! As promised here are a couple of pics of some model shops! I’ll start my saying they do things a little differently to us! Most towns have one, in big cities there are usually several in close proximity to each other! I initially visited the Rokuhan Tokyo showroom. They had the entire range as well as a large demonstrator layout (most larger shops have one). Despite the guy in there not speaking any English, before long we had the lights off running trains... I then visited a couple of other shops, one of which was in a department store (a common thing!) and this is the sort of thing to expect... They have most N gauge track work available from both kato and tomix and most N gauge chassis from kato, tomytec etc. The N gauge range is simply mind blowing. Any Japanese stock in existence seems to be available (even as an unpowered model which you buy a chassis for!). HO seems somewhat more limited, you have more chance of finding Z gauge than HO in most shops!The scenic items are few and far between as I understand most Japanese people set up for a running session and then dismantle again at the end, fully scenic layouts that we know are a luxury! Anyway, what's the plan? Well after some thorough "testing" I'll try and design some body shells in both Z gauge and N narrow gauge. Will start looking for some inspiration and see what I can come up with!
  4. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    So I’ve not progressed all that much since my last post. I’ve printed a few things from thingiverse (an online archive of 3D modela ready to print) which included a 009 slate wagon and a docklands light railway multiple unit. The slate wagon came out ok but Itried to be a bit clever and increased the print speed for the first few layers...this made the coupling points completely unusable. The docklands unit didn’t work at all (the file was the wrong size so needed scaling and it all got a bit messy). So learning points: accept that prints take time and design it yourself. I am getting to know the limitations of the printer now so I can begin to design models taking that into account. So what are my plans...well I’ve got an urge for N scale narrow gauge (Nn3) and a Z scale docklands light railway layout (to take advantage of the rokuhan small radius track). I’m off to Tokyo tomorrow for work so will be popping in to the rokuhan Tokyo shop to pick up a few of their “shorty” motorised chassis (at a tenner each I might get a few) and some trailer cars to butcher for their wheels; as well as some more Z track. The amount of model shops in Tokyo is simply mind boggling and there are always bargains to be had. All manner of kato and tomix chassis are available at very good prices...it’s a shame I stopped modelling N gauge. Unfortunately importing it to sell on above board removes any cost advantage! (I have looked into it! Haha) Anyway, I’ll post more progress as it comes! And if anyone wants pictures from Tokyo model shops let me know, I’ll happily share! Matt
  5. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    So I've been away for a few days but did another test print this evening...this time of a OO9 slate wagon (not my own design, something I found online which I could just get printing). I had a bit of an issue with bed adhesion again (may look into upgrading to a heated bed) but second time around it stuck. However, I thought I'd be clever and turn the printing speed up to speed up the process... not my best idea. The base of a few parts which were key supports came out far too weak to be used, which was a shame. But it's all a learning process. Back to designing things that I actually want to print now and see how I get on!
  6. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    Well first results are promising! I'm very happy with how easy the printer was to get going and get something useful out of it. Once I'd sorted some bed adhesion problems we were away! Now the test print...I appreciate these are tweaked to print as best as possible with the material provided but I am very happy with the results! There's a pic below... As a real test I printed my T Gauge class 450 bodyshell. I'd designed this to print in FUD from shapeways but was supposed to be a basic bodyshell ready to accept decals or similar. It's come out surprisingly well with smooth sides, there's just a small bit of detailing on the roof missing but I think this is down to limitations with the printer. Still, it's perfect as a test print!
  7. Matt’s 3D printing workbench...

    Well I thought it was about time I started a workbench thread, hoping that it will spur on my modelling a bit! Yesterday I bit the bullet and ordered a 3D printer. After a bit of research and shopping around I went for a wanhao duplicator i3 mini. There are several other printers that all look suspiciously similar (that’s the Chinese market for you!) so there should bereasonably good support available. This was slightly more expensive than other models I was looking at, but I liked that it was a small size and wouldn’t look too bad sat on my desk (compared to some other examples!) Within an hour of it being delivered I’m up and running and it’s currently printing a test print from the sd card, although I have no idea what it is yet! It’s not got the best specs, but I wanted something that I can have a play around with and print some test prints and that sort of thing. I also paid slightly more and ordered it from amazon so I can always send it back if it breaks! Hopefully this will spur me on to get back into modelling. I will almost certainly be going back to T gauge which I’ve been following for a few years now, but I’ve recently got hold of a bit of Z gauge stuff too (thanks to a few trips to Japan with work). If anyone wants any more info let me know, but I’ll report back the success of the initial print when it’s complete! Matt
  8. Which railway modelling mags do you read?

    I know this is an old thread (actually been meaning to reply for a while!) but there are ways to read railwaymagazines on the cheap...all you need is an iPad! I use an app called Readly, which is a monthly subscription (around 7 quid) and you can read unlimited magazines from its library. On the railway front it has Rail, Model Rail, Steam Railway and the Railway Magazine guide to modelling (the latter I believe is a new freebie you can pick up in model shops but is really quite good!) There are loads of other magazines for all tastes...I’m now flicking through 10 or so magazines a month. There’salso a cheeky way to read Railway Modeller too. If you get their app and take out a one month subscription (3.99) you get instant access to the entire back catalogue that’s been digitised (I’ve just looked...back to 2011). It’s great to have a flick through, get inspiration from the one or two articles that peak your interest and not have to shell out for each issue. Just make sure you cancel the subscription in iTunes (or it’ll auto-renew) and once your months up you lose access. This also works for continental modeller, but you have to do it separately. I find that all these magazines are very similar and, as has been mentioned, the how to articles seem to keep coming around. So I don’t mind which one I read, it just gives me that motivation I need! Hope this helps someone! Matt
  9. Leberecht, my Prussian H0 layout.

    Nice woodwork here! I've never thought to paint the underside of baseboards white, but I may start doing that myself! Any pictures of the traverser? Keep the updates coming! Matt
  10. Hello! I've done tests with N gauge peco flex track down to silly radii and most narrow gauge 0-4-0 with small wheels work. The smallest I did was a circle of track on a CD and my Graham farish class 08 managed (just). Tomix do N gauge track down to 103mm radius which seems widely used for micro layouts...a quick Google should give some results from that!
  11. Thanks for that Jim! Simple yet effective...the way modelling should be! Matt
  12. Hi Jim, these are all fantastic looking micros! The level of detail is truly stunning. If you have a chance, could you go into a bit of detail on your traverser construction? Cheers, Matt
  13. Hello all, I feel it's about time to introduce myself (considering I've been lurking around for some time!) I've modelled in many scales, starting out in 00, then moving to N, trying some 009 and more recently Nn3, however a lot of my modelling efforts are focussed on T gauge. I know some don't see it as a credible scale, but I love the idea of a railway in a landscape, which people have done successfully! I currently don't have a layout though. I also do a lot of 3D modelling, Icustom design and 3D print my own T gauge stock (I don't have my own printer...yet!) and I'm hping to expand this to using laser cut ply for baseboard construction.I'm also a big fan of automation. I've attempted it in the past using analogue control and electronics but I have recently got my hands on an arduino and hope to use this in the future! There are some superb layouts on here full of inspiration, I'll try and show you the sort of things I get up to in the near future! Matt